Dog Breeds 101: Bedlington Terrier

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Dog Breeds 101 - Bedlington Terrier
Photo – Wikipedia – lic. under GNU

Don’t let the Bedlington Terrier’s appearance fool you – it may look like a gentle lamb but it has the heart of a lion. With its crisp and curly coat and relaxed nature, it is considered to be unusual compared to other terrier breeds. The Bedlington can weigh between 17 to 23 pounds and can grow up to 18 inches tall. Considered to be a moderately sized dog, it is suited for small homes, apartments and condos. [1]

The Bedlington Terrier is named after its place of origin, Bedlington in Nothumberland, England. There, the dogs were the favorite companions of miners and used to be referred to as the Rodbury or Rothbury Terriers because the Lord of Rothbury had taken a particular liking to them. Before this, they were known as “gypsy dogs” as gypsies used them to hunt small game. The first dog to be called a “Bedlington Terrier” was named Young Piper owned by Joseph Ainsley from Bedlington. Piper is called as the best dog of his race due to his amazing skills in hunting and his courageous nature. He began hunting badgers as early as eight months old and continued hunting until he was blind with old age. [2]

In mid-1800s, Bedlingtons joined other dogs in the show ring and in 1877, the National Bedlington Terrier Club was established in England. In 1886, the first Bedlington Terrier (named Ananias) was registered to the American Kennel Club. [3]

Even though the Bedlington looks like a lamb, it has the qualities of a wolf – it can fight and chase down tough opponents so never mistake it to be delicate. Lithe and graceful, this terrier has proven itself as a loyal and good companion. As a household pet, it will not start fights but will never run away from one. When forced, the Bedlington can become an aggressive fighter. Outdoors, it has the tendency to chase small animals so it is not wise to let it roam. [4]

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